BILDERFAHRZEUGE Blog

Like a leaf in the wind…

While the iconography of leaflets has been researched again and again – especially since Warburg – less so the political agency of their dissemination and their reception. And yet these prints with text and image, already circulating in the late Middle Ages, quite rightly deserve their poetic name: “leaflet” or “flyer”, in German “Flugblatt” (lit.: flying leaf), in French occasionally even “papillon” (“butterfly”).

The KHI Amerindian Lecture Series 2021

16 September – 16 December 2021


In the framework of Department Gerhard Wolf & 4A_Laboratory: Art Histories, Archaeologies, Anthropologies, Aesthetics
Organized by Bilderfahrzeuge Research Associate Sanja Savkić Šebek (KHI in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut & Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) & Bat-ami Artzi (Dumbarton Oaks)

New Publication: Dürers Schuhe

A new article by Prof. Andreas Beyer.

In: Tina Asmussen, Eva Brugger, Maike Christadler, Anja Rathmann-Lutz, Anna Reimann, Carla Roth, Sarah-Maria Schober, Ina Serif (Hg.): Materialized Histories. Eine Festschrift 2.0, 10/08/2021

Fellowship award and new book announcement for Alexandra Marraccini

We are delighted to announce that our colleague Dr Alexandra Marraccini has been selected as a 2021/22 National Book Critics’ Circle Emerging Critics Fellow.

Moreover, her first book on critical writing WE THE PARASITES is to be published in the US by Sublunary Editions in Autumn 2022.

On the connectivity of fabrics: ‘Gaia mother tree’ by Ernesto Neto

In 2018, the Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto created, through a collective process, a monumental textile installation in the main station of Zurich called Gaia mother tree that was organised by the Fondation Beyeler. The textile object looks like a twenty-meter high plant, that reaches up to the ceiling of the station building and fills the entrance hall with bright and warm colours. Its translucent structure is made of mainly yellow, orange, red and light green hand-knotted cotton strips. On closer inspection, the meticulous knotting of the fabric becomes visible.

A posthumous publication: Frank Martin’s “Camillo Rusconi: ein Bildhauer des Spätbarock in Rom” (2019)

When recently I took Frank Martin’s posthumously published book off the shelf at the Warburg Institute I was pursuing issues relating to eighteenth-century Italian sculpture, in particular the making and use of models. But the book attracted me also on a personal level. Frank Martin died unexpectedly at the age of 53 in 2014. I knew him well from periods when we had worked at the same institutions, in 1993 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, where he was a postdoctoral fellow, and again in 1996 at the Warburg Institute, where he held a three-month Frances Yates Fellowship.

New Publication: “Art History Before English”

This book addresses a phenomenon that pervades the field of art history and indeed scholarship in general: the fact that English has become academia’s most prominent and widely adopted language. Seeking to shed light on the particular issues that English’s rise to prominence poses for art history, the essays in this volume investigate the history of the discipline itself: specifically, the extent to which the European tradition of art historical writing has always been shaped by the presence of dominant languages.

Der „Wald von Paris“: Die Rekonstruktion des Dachstuhls von Notre Dame

Fällt ein Baum im Wald… Das bekannte Gleichnis fragt nach der Beziehung von Ereignis und Wahrnehmung respektive nach der Bedeutung von Zeugenschaft und berührt somit letztlich ein geschichtstheoretisches Problem. In den Wäldern Frankreichs fallen derzeit Bäume zu tausenden. Darüber, ob ihr Sturz ein Geräusch verursacht, braucht nicht spekuliert werden: Zeugen sind genügend vorhanden. Die Bäume, allesamt Eichen, werden gefällt für die Instandsetzung von Notre Dame, den hölzernen Dachstuhl um genau zu sein.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search